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 Harper's
(1850-2005)

In 1817, two young brothers, James and John Harper, opened a small printing company in New York. Their two other brothers, Joseph and Fletcher, joined the company shortly thereafter, and by 1825 Harper & Brothers had become the largest book publisher in the United States. Having noticed the success in Britain of the London Daily News, Fletcher Harper launched Harper's New Monthly Magazine in June 1850, and it was so popular that in 1857 he also launched Harper's Weekly. Within 10 years the circulation of Harper's Weekly reached 200,000. An important feature of the Harper's publications was that they were heavily illustrated by engravings of high quality. The cartoonist Thomas Nast was recruited in 1862, and virtually invented political caricature (he also invented the donkey and elephant symbols for the Democratic and Republican parties, and designed our modern image of Santa Claus). By the late 1800's Harper's had won a high reputation for hiring the best artists and illustrators, including Frank Bellew, Charles Dana Gibson, Fred Repington, Howard Pyle, James Flagg and Maxfield Parrish. Over the years, numerous articles having to do with mining were published, and the illustrations from those articles retain their interest today. In 1900 the monthly changed its name to Harper's Monthly Magazine, and in 1913 became simply Harper's Magazine, It is still being published.

W.E.W.

Click on thumbnail picture to see larger image.
Number of artworks found: 27 | Artworks being viewed: 17 to 24

The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Pursuit of Knowledge under Difficulties Pursuit of Knowledge under Difficulties
Steel engraving (1860), unsigned, from the article "Artist life in the highlands of New Jersey" by John R. Chapin, publish in the April 1860 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 20, no. 119, pages 577-598 (Mineralogical Record Library).
The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Gallery in Byram Mine Gallery in Byram Mine
Steel engraving (1860), unsigned, from the article "Artist life in the highlands of New Jersey" by John R. Chapin, publish in the April 1860 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 20, no. 119, pages 577-598 (Mineralogical Record Library).
The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Interior of the Mine Interior of the Mine
Steel engraving (1860), unsigned, from the article "Artist life in the highlands of New Jersey" by John R. Chapin, publish in the April 1860 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 20, no. 119, pages 577-598 (Mineralogical Record Library).
The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Mouth of the Adit, Sweed's Mine Mouth of the Adit, Sweed's Mine
Steel engraving (1860), unsigned, from the article "Artist life in the highlands of New Jersey" by John R. Chapin, publish in the April 1860 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 20, no. 119, pages 577-598 (Mineralogical Record Library).
The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Another Mode of Washing for Silver Another Mode of Washing for Silver
Steel engraving (1867), unsigned, from the article "The Mines of Santa Eulalia" by Lew Wallace, publish in the November 1867 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 25, no.210, pages 681-702 (Mineralogical Record Library).
The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Finding Gold Finding Gold
Steel engraving (1857), unsigned, from the article "North Carolina Illustrated -- the Gold Region" by Porte Crayon, publish in the August 1857 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 15, no. 87, pages 289-300 (Mineralogical Record Library).
The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Mat Moyle and Nicky Trevethan Mat Moyle and Nicky Trevethan
Steel engraving (1857), unsigned, from the article "North Carolina Illustrated -- the Gold Region" by Porte Crayon, publish in the August 1857 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 15, no. 87, pages 289-300 (Mineralogical Record Library).
The Mineralogical Record:  Harper's - Descending the Ladder-Shaft Descending the Ladder-Shaft
Steel engraving (1857), unsigned, from the article "North Carolina Illustrated -- the Gold Region" by Porte Crayon, publish in the August 1857 edition of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, volume 15, no. 87, pages 289-300 (Mineralogical Record Library).
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