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David K. Joyce
(1954-    )

David Kenneth Joyce was born in Toronto, Ontario, on March 11, 1954, the son of and Elaine Roworth and Kenneth L. Joyce, former Senior Vice President of Reed Stenhouse, Insurance. He grew up in Scarborough, Ontario, the easternmost suburb of Toronto, graduating with a degree in mining engineering technology in 1976 from the Haileybury School of Mines in Haileybury, Ontario. Between 1976 and 1997 he worked in various technical, sales, business, and executive roles at CIL Explosives, Inc. (later known as ICI Explosives and now known as Orica). From 1997 to 2009 he has worked several stints with engineering and mining contracting companies, most recently as Vice President of Business development with SNC-Lavalin Engineers and Constructors, the largest Mining and Metallurgical engineering company in the world.

David first became interested in minerals while examining garnets on the shore of his grandfather's cottage in near-northern Ontario. Early visits to the Royal Ontario Museum and its mineral exhibits cemented his interest, and his father obtained specimens for his growing collection from his business friends. His early mentors in mineral collecting included some of the senior members of the Scarborough Gem and Mineral Club (such as Cynthia Peat, Joey Galt, and the Reinert Family), and also "Digger" John Gorman" of the University of Toronto and the Walker Mineralogical Club.

David's personal mineral collection currently numbers about 800 specimens, with dual emphasis on Canadian Minerals and on international sulfides, sulfosalts and native elements. He sold half of his original collection (retaining only the above specialties) to Rod Tyson in 1999.

David has written three articles for Rocks & Minerals magazine – "Red Lake mine: the richest gold mine in the world" (2004), "Gold in the Canadian Shield" (2006), and "Calcite vein-dikes of the Grenville Geological Province, Ontario, Canada" (2006) –and is currently working on an article on the Cobalt, Ontario, Mining Camp with Royal Ontario Museum staff. In addition he has presented a number of talks at the Rochester Mineralogical Symposium, the Tucson Show, and many other symposia and meetings.

He began dealing part-time in minerals in 1984, under the business name of Northern Crystals, and started advertising in the Mineralogical Record in January-February 1985. The ads continued through 1989, then began anew ten tears later as "David K. Joyce." He specialized in Canadian and metallic minerals, sending out typewritten lists of minerals around the world for many years, the first of which were typed out on Joe Nagel's father's antique typewriter. He tried to go full-time in mineral dealing a couple of times (longest stint in 2003-2006), but was tempted back into the mining industry by lucrative job offers. He finally got back to full-time mineral dealing in 2008 and plans now to stay that way.

David has attended the Bancroft Gemboree since 1960s. He attended his first Tucson Show in 1986 or so, sharing a room with Joe Nagel, and sold minerals from a room at the Travelodge (with Darryl McFarlane and Brad Wilson) during the Tucson Show, in the mid to late 1980s. His brother Brian has helped him out at the Tucson and Denver Shows from time to time, and his son Daniel has collected with him at East Coast localities. His then-wife, Sharon, is listed on some of the older mineral labels but never really took part in the business. His mineral dealership today is solely a one-man operation, primarily via his website (www.davidkjoyceminerals.com). David is proud that his website caters to “down to earth” collectors interested in unusual localities, field collecting and some of the “less-sexy” minerals of the mineral world. His website has a couple of sections with articles on field collecting and exposés of recent collecting activities.

He has always field collected, at Canadian localities from coast-to coast, and has made specimen-buying trips to Peru, Mexico, and the United Kingdom. He prepared and sold over 1,500 gold specimens for Goldcorp, Inc. over a period of six years, and also sold gold specimens for the McWatters Mining Company, Inc. He worked as a contract collector and seller of rare minerals from the giant Tanco mine pegmatite deposit in Manitoba, and (with Brad Wilson and Dave van Dieren) collected the best Canadian Japan-law twin quartz crystals ever found at Foley Mountain, British Columbia.

David is currently Director of Eastmain Resources Inc., an advanced, publicly listed, junior gold exploration and development company with major gold property holdings in northern Quebec (see www.eastmain.com). He is also Vice President of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (www.cim.org), President of the Newmarket Folk Society (www.newmarketfolksociety.org), and co-founder of the Young Toronto Mineralogists Club (www.ytmc.org), an organization for young people, aged 8-15, now in its 7th year of operation.

In recognition of his many contributions to the mineral world he received the Outstanding Service Award presented by the Central Canadian Federation of Mineral Societies. He has served as Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Toronto (1999-2007), in the field of Explosives and Fragmentation in Mining. He is a Past Chairman of the Toronto Branch of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, has been elected a Fellow of that organization, and is a recipient of the Past President's medal. He currently serves as Vice president of the Walker Mineralogical Club (having been President twice (www.walkermineralogicalclub.com), and is a member of the International Society of Explosives Engineers.

Up until 30 years of age, David was an avid athlete--mostly basketball and English-style rugby; he played for the Newfoundland Provincial Team, and Captained the Cape Speak Castaways of St. John's. He also played for the Sudbury Exiles, the Markham Marauders and the Balmy Beach Colts. On the side he has played guitar, banjo and harmonicas since his teen years, and enjoys playing contemporary folk music with his partner Carol Teal; they have two published CD recordings (see www.carolanddavid.ca). David is a member of the Board of Directors of ArtsCan Circle, an organization that sends teams of musical and visual artists to work with indigenous youth in remote communities in Canada's north (see www.artscancircle.ca).

In 2014, David merged his mineral and musical interests to release a CD recording of upbeat mineral collecting and mining songs entitled “Nuggets and High Grade” that he has written over the years. He has performed the songs at mineral shows and symposia on an ad hoc basis, usually late at night in hotel rooms. Songs on the CD include "Damn the Glaciers," "The Dealer," "Digging in a Hole" and "Crystal Systems."

He can be reached at dkjoyce@bellnet.ca.

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Addresses:
1954-1972 Scarborough, Ontario
1972-1976, Haileybury, Ontario
1976-1978 Sudbury, Ontario
1978-1980 Cornerbrook, Newfoundland
1980-1982 St. John's Newfoundland
1982-1984 Markham, Ontario
1984-1986 Vancouver, British Columbia
1986-1988 Kamloops, British Columbia
1988-present Newmarket, Ontario
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[Citation format for this entry:
WILSON, Wendell E. (2017)
Mineralogical Record
Biographical Archive, at www.mineralogicalrecord.com.]
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The Mineralogical Record - David K. Joyce David K. Joyce
The Mineralogical Record - David K. Joyce 34 x 68 mm
The Mineralogical Record - David K. Joyce 44 x 51 mm
The Mineralogical Record - David K. Joyce 50 x 89 mm
(1986-1988)
The Mineralogical Record - David K. Joyce 49 x 71 mm
(1988-present)
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