The Mineralogical Record
The Mineralogical Record - Join us on Facebook!  The Mineralogical Record - Sign up for our newsletter

 Columbia School of Mines
(1864-    )

The School of Mines of Columbia University in New York City, founded in 1864, was the first mining and metallurgy school in the U.S. The mineral collection was established at about the same time, with the donation of the fine collection of Robert Gilmor (1774-1848) by Gouverneur Kemble (1786-1875), a wealthy two-term United States Congressman, diplomat and industrialist. Kemble had purchased the collection from Gilmor's heirs for $2000. Other collections and specimens were donated to the school in the years following.

It became the foundation of Columbia's School of Engineering and Applied Science and later the home of the Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Mineral Engineering. However, the title "School of Mines" was retained by Columbia University, honoris causa. In 1964, one century after its formation, the School of Mines was renamed the Henry Krumb School of Mines in honor of a generous alumnus. The School of Mines produced the first mining handbook by Professor Peele, the first mineral processing handbook by Professor Taggart, and other pioneering work in mineral beneficiation, chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport phenomena in mineral extraction and processing. The mining engineers trained at Columbia's School of Mines during the 19th and 20th centuries contributed much in developing the technologies for the mining industry.

Three-fourths of the Columbia mineral collection (about 30,000 specimens) were ultimately sold to the American Museum of Natural History in 1979, and with it went much of the Gilmor collection—excluding some of the larger or better specimens. Unfortunately there is no catalog accompanying the collection, so the only data available on each piece is what is on the label, but the specimens at Columbia that are still labeled as the Kemble collection are almost certainly Gilmor specimens, as there is no evidence that Kemble added to it before turning it over to Columbia.
To contribute more information please E-mail us at: minrecord@comcast.net

[Citation format for this entry:
WILSON, Wendell E. (2017)
Mineralogical Record
Biographical Archive, at www.mineralogicalrecord.com.]
Click on thumbnail picture to see larger image.
Number of labels found: 8 | Labels being viewed: 1 to 8

The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines Label from the beginning of the school, 1864, when Gouverneur Kemble donated the Robert Gilmore collection.
The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines Label from the beginning of the school, 1864, when Gouverneur Kemble donated the Robert Gilmore collection.
The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines 42 x 70 mm; label for a Kemble/Gilmor collection specimen, probably a second-generation label rewritten after the school had better labels printed.
The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines 42 x 70 mm; label for a specimen from the collection of Thomas Egleston (1832-1900), one of the founding professors at the Columbia School of Mines, purchased and donated by A.H. and C.T. Barney.
The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines 42 x 70 mm; label for a specimen donated by John Strong Newberry (1822-1892).
The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines 42 x 70 mm; label for a specimen donated by James F. Kemp (1859-1926), Professor of Geology at the School of Mines from 1891 to 1917.
The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines 42 x 70 mm; label for a specimen from the collection of Columbia Professor Thomas Egleston (1832-1900), donated by his brother, David Stebbins Egleston, in 1869.
The Mineralogical Record -  Columbia School of Mines 42 x 70 mm; label for a specimen donated by Robert Hoe (1839-1909), a prominent printer and friend of the College.
Contents copyright © 2017 The Mineralogical Record, Inc. All rights reserved.  
Graphic design of this website by Wendell E. Wilson. Website programming by ASPConnections.net