The Mineralogical Record
The Mineralogical Record - Join us on Facebook!  The Mineralogical Record - Sign up for our newsletter

Norman Pellman
(1922-2004)

Norm Pellman was born on July 5, 1922, in Manhattan and died unexpectedly at his home in Green Valley, Arizona on April 4, 2004. He and his wife Roz (Roslyn, whom he married in 1969) built a beautiful display collection of nearly 500 colorful minerals in all sizes, from thumbnails to large cabinet specimens. The collection was arrayed in their home in two large, well-designed wall-cases with independent lighting above each specimen on each shelf.

Norm graduated from De Witt Clinton High School in the Bronx and studied pre-Law at St. John's University before enlisting in the Army Air Corps in 1943. While in the service he studied at Los Angeles University, then attended cryptography school. As a cryptographer he coded and decoded secret information on guided missiles and submarine reconnaissance. Later, while stationed in Alamogordo, New Mexico, he worked on communications codes for the atomic bomb project.

After the war Norm worked for a chemical company for 18 months, but was eager to be his own boss. He was a natural entrepreneur, and enjoyed the process of starting small companies on a shoestring and nurturing them to success. It didn't really matter what the product of a company was; Norm always found a way to make products and sell them at a nice profit. With a capital of just $650 he founded the Coastal Chemical Corporation; after building sales into the millions of dollars he sold the company to a conglomerate in 1973. He continued running Coastal Chemical for another four years before deciding to try a new field. With a minimal investment he started Global World Imports (G.W.I.) Corporation, an emblematic jewelry corporation, and after also making that venture into a multi-million-dollar operation he sold it in 1977.

Norm and Roz developed an interest in minerals rather late in life, in 1973. While on business in Pittsburgh they visited Horn's Dept store, where they bought a decorator amethyst specimen. That inspired the two of them to take a course in mineralogy, and from there they discovered the mineral world and started visiting mineral shows listed in Lapidary Journal, finally discovering the Tucson Show. They met Dave Wilber, who arranged for them a three-week round of visiting 18 private mineral collections in California. Norm and Roz then began building their beautiful collection. Norm also enjoyed photography, and began taking large-format photos of their specimens.A number of their specimens have been pictured in past issues of The Mineralogical Record.

In 1999 Norm and Roz had a beautiful custom retirement home built in Green Valley, Arizona, just south of Tucson, and moved there, where they entertained mineral people frequently and enjoyed showing their collection. Norm was a happy, friendly, intelligent and always interesting character. He and Roz attended the Tucson Show together faithfully for many years, and had an extensive circle of friends in the mineral world. Their collection was acquired in September 2006 by Bryan Lees (Collector's Edge Minerals), Wayne and Dona Leicht (Kristalle), and Ian Bruce (Mineral Classics).

Reference:
WILSON, W.E. (2004) Died, Norman Pellman, 81. Mineralogical Record, 35, 364.
To contribute more information please E-mail us at: minrecord@comcast.net

[Citation format for this entry:
WILSON, Wendell E. (2017)
Mineralogical Record
Biographical Archive, at www.mineralogicalrecord.com.]
Click on thumbnail picture to see larger image.
Number of labels found: 5 | Labels being viewed: 1 to 5

The Mineralogical Record - Norman Pellman Norm Pellman
The Mineralogical Record - Norman Pellman 51 x 76 mm
The Mineralogical Record - Norman Pellman 51 x 76 mm
The Mineralogical Record - Norman Pellman 51 x 76 mm
The Mineralogical Record - Norman Pellman 51 x 76 mm
Contents copyright © 2017 The Mineralogical Record, Inc. All rights reserved.  
Graphic design of this website by Wendell E. Wilson. Website programming by ASPConnections.net